jamie_oliver

Last week, I wrote about what Aristotle can teach us about creating the most persuasive presentations. Because, if you’ve got a good idea, you want to make sure the right people get behind it.

If you’ve got a good idea, you want to make sure the right people get behind it

Just to recap, you need to use:

Pathos – to evoke feelings

Ethos – to give your presentation credibility

Logos – to give your presentation logic

You can also think of this as creating the why, how and what of your argument.

In the comments, I was asked if there was a good example of a talk that used these principles well. So I gave a link to Jamie Oliver’s brilliant TED talk. I’m now going to explain what he did so well and what we can learn from it.

But first, here’s the video:

Good, isn’t it?

Jamie Oliver’s Passionate case for an all-out assault on our ignorance about food has many points that correspond to Aristotle’s approach to persuasion. 

1. Create a STORY that engages the audience’s interest. (Pathos)

“Sadly in the next 18 minutes when I do our chat 4 Americans that are alive, will be dead through the food that they eat.”

2. Raise a PROBLEM that needs a solution. (Logos)

“The adults of the last four generations have blessed our children with the destiny of a shorter lifespan than their children.”

3. Offer a SOLUTION to the problem raised

“We’ve got to start teaching our kids about food in our schools. Period.”

4. Describe the BENEFITS for adopting the course of action. (Ethos)

“It’s profoundly important that every single American child leaves school knowing how to cook ten recipes that will save their life.”

“You’re cleverer if you eat well, live longer.”

5. State a call to ACTION

What do you want your audience to do?

“I wish for everyone to help create a strong, sustainable movement to educate every child about food, inspire families to cook again and empower people everywhere to fight obesity.”

Next time you’re doing a presentation, you could do worse than emulate Jamie OliverClick To Tweet

So next time you’re doing a presentation, you could do worse than emulate Jamie Oliver. Follow this structure, keep things simple and deliver it with passion. 

Your audience will appreciate it.

https://i1.wp.com/openforideas.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/jamie_oliver.png?fit=1024%2C576https://i1.wp.com/openforideas.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/jamie_oliver.png?resize=150%2C150Byron WijayawardenaPresentationsaristotle,ethos,food,jamie oliver,logos,obesity,pathos,presentation,TED
Last week, I wrote about what Aristotle can teach us about creating the most persuasive presentations. Because, if you’ve got a good idea, you want to make sure the right people get behind it. Just to recap, you need to use: • Pathos - to evoke feelings • Ethos - to...
Byron Wijayawardena on LinkedinByron Wijayawardena on Twitter
Byron Wijayawardena
Byron has done a lot of presentations… A LOT! Over 11 years at Apple - on average 4 presentations a week - that's almost 2000 presentations, not to mention all the presentations he has had to sit through from probably the best presenters on the planet. You would hope he would have learnt a thing or two about presentations - something that he would be glad to pass on to you.